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Tutorials

How to Debate & Choose Art on LASTLOOK

15 May 2015 | No Comments | LASTLOOK Team
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A great way to use LASTLOOK is for sharing art.  It works great for all types of people interested in art; gallerists, buyers, interior designers or simply interested fairgoers! For instance, the LASTLOOK team went to Frieze NY on Thursday and shared lots of snapshots.

First step is to create the project. Tap the + icon in the bottom left to create the project. Here, I add in a title, a profile photo (tap the folder icon to change the profile photo), and add members to the project.

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As I wander through the art fair, I upload photos in the moment.  Tap the camera icon in the bottom center to take a new photo in the app.

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Then, I can add in comments, sharing the artist info, pricing and/or my thoughts on the piece. The other members of the project then get notified of the new additions in this project, and can give their feedback. I’m automatically notified in the app once they do, and can easily see the new activity in both the grid view (second icon in top menu bar) and the activity feed (last icon in top menu bar). If you click on the notification in the activity feed, it will bring you directly to the photo in question.

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From there, I can just scroll through the feedback. And that’s it! Try it out this weekend at Frieze and let us know your thoughts.

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Features

Legendary Collaboration:
Merce Cunningham & Rei Kawakubo

06 March 2015 | 1 Comment | LASTLOOK Team
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In the contemporary fashion vocabulary, “collaboration” is a term typically used as a marketing catch phrase by retail giants such as Target and H & M. However there are countless other collaborations that are far less commercial, and entail cross-disciplinary projects between designers and artists of other mediums that result in films, art books, objet d’art, and performances. One of the best examples of such a collaboration is an extraordinary project entitled Scenario that renowned choreographer Merce Cunningham created with fashion designer Rei Kawakubo in 1997.

Both Cunningham and Kawakubo created groundbreaking work and were leaders of their respective fields. Kawakubo, founder of Comme des Garcons, began designing in Tokyo in the late 1960s, and was immediately touted as one of the most important members of the sartorial avant-garde. Her perpetually evolving designs were based on pushing boundaries and questioning aesthetic standards. Cunningham was, similarly, at the forefront of his metier, choreographing works for over 50 years that changed the face of contemporary dance and performance.

Fashion was very boring, and I was very angry. I wanted to do something extremely strong. It was a reaction. – Rei Kawakubo

Collaborations were elemental to Cunningham’s practice, and he invited Kawakubo to design the costumes, set and lighting for Scenario. 1997 saw the debut of Comme des Garcons’ notorious spring/summer collection entitled “Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body” (later referred to as the “lumps and bumps” show), and it was this body of work that inspired her designs for the collaboration. The now-iconic collection featured bulging, almost grotesque shapes that protruded from the body around the hips, chest, and stomach, made of down padding. Kawakubo has explained that her inspiration for the collection was a reaction to the fashion system: “Fashion was very boring, and I was very angry. I wanted to do something extremely strong. It was a reaction. The feeling was to design the body.”

Comme des Garcons Spring/Summer 1997.

Comme des Garcons Spring/Summer 1997.

Cunningham was known for his chance-driven choreography that focused on the juxtaposition and movement of dancers’ body parts, interacting in a seemingly autonomous way, free of expectations or typical patterns and rules of dance. His aim was to reimagine the shapes a dancer’s body could adopt. As a result, his choreography took on an aesthetic many described as “deformed,” with shapes and movements that twisted the body into unnatural, or at least unprecedented, formations. What better designer to collaborate with, then, than the boundary-pushing fashion maven whose work had drawn very similar interpretations?

The collaboration was especially remarkable because Cunningham and Kawakubo worked independently of one another up until the actual performance, when at last the choreography and designs interacted with each other. The emphasis was, once again, on the idea of leaving things up to chance, and not relying on previously conceived instructions for how things would turn out. The costumes were correspondingly not customized to fit the movements of the dancers, which radically altered their movements by upsetting their sense of proportion and balance. One dancer stated that her costume was like a “hot and bulky parka” and that it interrupted her view of the other dancers, while another noted that she had to adapt her dancing to fit the garment. This was the essence of the collaboration, to create a situation in which the action of the dancers was ultimately left up to chance, depending on how the costumes would effect the dancers ability to carry out the choreography.

Merce Cunningham rehearses with his dance group in 1957.

Merce Cunningham rehearses with his dance group in 1957.

The performance was a stunning mixture of the two iconoclasts’ visions. The performance placed fashion within a context that it normally doesn’t inhabit, and future collaborators would do well to remember the mutually beneficial space offered to fashion by dance. The most effective collaborations are those in which each participant brings their unique approach to the piece, and Scenario fulfilled this better than most.



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5 Questions

5 Questions for
Fashion Designer & Creative Consultant,
Geren Lockhart

28 October 2014 | No Comments | LASTLOOK Team
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Fashion designer and creative consultant Geren Lockhart answers LASTBLOG’s 5 Questions, discussing the nature of creation and collaboration.


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5 Questions

5 Questions for Gallery Owner, Catinca Tabacaru

09 September 2014 | 1 Comment | LASTLOOK Team
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For our 5 Questions series, we ask creative professionals five questions about the nature of creation and collaboration. This week we spoke with Catinca Tabacaru, owner and director of the CATINCA TABACARU gallery in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Having spent years as a human rights lawyer, Catinca began working as an art dealer and curator in 2009 when she founded Tinca Art Inc. Expanding Tinca Art into a public gallery this past May, Catinca recently emailed us from New York City to talk about how travel effects her work, her favorite show she’s ever curated, and her love of Antoni Gaudi.

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Profiles

Pushing Creativity

How Ji Lee, Facebook’s Creative Strategist, Coaxes Creativity out of His Audience

29 July 2014 | No Comments | LASTLOOK Team
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As a creative strategist at Facebook, Ji Lee operates at the cross-section between creativity and technology, creating art that reflects both worlds. After a long career in the ad world, where he worked as creative director for agencies like Saatchi & Saatchi and Droga5, Ji moved into the tech sector in 2008, working as a creative director at Google before moving into his current role at Facebook at 2011. With a fondness for personal projects – many of which have a strong presence on the internet – Ji’s work takes on many modern cultural tableaux with a strong element of humor and a focus on collaboration and participation from his audience.

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Interviews

Interview: Artist Sebastien Leon

10 June 2014 | 1 Comment | LASTLOOK Team
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Sebastien Leon transforms spaces with sculpture and sound. Creating installations that can take up entire rooms, Leon frequently uses sound not only to enhance his art, but to help him realize each piece’s goals. As much a musician as a visual artist, his work shows that visual and audio perception are essentially inseparable, just as they are in the natural world. A frequent collaborator with other artists and musicians from around the world, he holds a unique perspective about how contemporary art exists across cultures. He recently spoke to us over email from his studio in Tribeca, NYC, to discuss some of his recent pieces, his interest in the increasing cross-disciplinary projects, and how he embraces the unexpected when creating something new.

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Interviews

Interview: Artists Jonah Freeman & Justin Lowe

03 June 2014 | 1 Comment | LASTLOOK Team
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Through their art, Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe bring their audience into a fully formed world of their own creation. The two have been making large scale installations for the last 10 years, and have become renowned for the intense attention to detail they put into every piece. Walking through the rooms Freeman and Lowe create, visitors will find libraries full of completely original books and disused print factories and commercials that never existed, all to make the installations feel like a forgotten piece of history. Though they’ve been working on a new installation, they spoke to us via email about about their long-running collaboration, the research and details required to make their installations believable, and how their previous installations affect any new work they begin.

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