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Features

The Travelers Guide to Last Look

26 June 2016 | No Comments | Kara Ladd
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By: Kara Ladd

Wanderlust (noun, wan-der-lust, ˈwän-dər-ˌləst): a strong desire to travel (Merriam Webster). Wanderlust is a term coined by the millennial generation caused by a shift in mindset from products to experiences. An increase of interest in travel is evident as the majority of students and young professionals today would rather collect experiences rather than products. The trend is apparent in other demographics in society, but not as prevalent. This interest in travel and culture has coincidentally peaked in parallel with social media-perhaps a consequence of individuals being exposed to other cultures, places, and opportunities online. Whether traveling across the globe or across town, people are consistently taking photos and sharing them with their peers through social media. However, it is likely that a bulk of photos taken will be kept private and archived for personal reflection.

Last Look is a platform where travelers can upload, comment and edit photos for their own private use. The app can be used to categorize and share photos with fellow travelers to stay in touch or keep on file prior to posting on social media at a later date. It is apparent that there are a variety of different methods to share photos digitally: email, Facebook, google drive, a shared photo album on an iPhone, and more. However, email is time consuming, Facebook has privacy implications, you can’t comment on singular photos on google drive, and you must have an Apple device to ‘share’ an album via an iPhone. Alas, Last Look creates a simple, protected, effective way to communicate with peers while traveling and sharing photos. Last Look gives groups of travelers the chance to connect, share and reminisce. 

Following are a handful of tips to organize travel photos with your friends, family and fellow travelers. 

1. Projects can be organized by travel destination, fellow travelers or date/time.

2. If traveling in a group, you can have one central project where all photos are archived.

3. Specific “projects” can be shared with people you meet while traveling.

4. Once the photos have been liked or “approved” by your fellow travelers you can post to social media.

5. Stay in touch with newfound friends you meet abroad by commenting and liking the photos shared with them at a later date.


Features And News

Fashion Culture Design: Is Fashion Week Vanishing Before Our Eyes?

10 June 2016 | No Comments | Kara Ladd
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Fashion Culture Design: presented by Simon Collins

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From left to right: Rachna Shah, KCD Worldwide; Sarah Rutson, Net-a-Porter; Katherine Zarrella, Fashion Unfiltered; Andrew Rosen, Theory; Gary Wassner, Hilldun Corporation

By: Kara Ladd

The framework was simple–50 speakers, over 500 attendees and 12 questions–but the content was relatively weighty. Simon Collin’s first Fashion Culture Design unconference proved to be a success as a crowd of industry trailblazers, global leaders, students, and teachers convened at Parsons School of Design to discuss key issues about the fashion industry at large. Subjects from sustainability and fashion week to social media and millennials were all discussed in an “unfiltered” environment. Unfiltered that is except when “swear words” such as disruption, influencers, or game changer were used on stage, a donation to MSF (Doctors Without Borders) was made.
One of the most intriguing conversations revolved around the structure and strategy behind fashion week–a hot topic of discussion lately with the release of CFDA and The Boston Consulting Group’s study. The fashion calendar is comprised of a heavy, labor-intensive schedule that exhausts designers to produce collections at a rapid rate of 5 times per year (Spring RTW, Fall RTW, Pre-Fall, Resort, and Couture). Today, a lot of designers are breaking the cycle and designing “buy now, wear now” collections. A lot of brands are experimenting with these new opportunities(to design on their own schedule) to figure the best way to sell to their target consumers. Furthermore, many designers are straying away from the extravagant runway show, opting for a more personal and intimate presentation. The industry is at a pivotal stage of transition and the need for organization, communication, and structure is paramount.

Innovation is at the core of resolving these issues and fashion tech apps such as Last Look can aid in the motion towards a more efficient fashion calendar. Brands such as Rebecca Minkoff, Tom Ford and Burberry have implemented a “see now, buy now”  sales strategies where products are instantly available for sale once they hit the runway. Through Last Look images can be edited internally and approved quickly so they are readily available for the consumer to purchase on their website, social media or elsewhere. The industry is evolving, download Last Look and don’t get left behind.


Features And Profiles

Last Look User Spotlight: Bride-to-Be Alexandra Browne

24 May 2016 | No Comments | Kara Ladd
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By: Kara Ladd

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Alexandra Browne is a New York native, born and raised, and was engaged last December 2015. She is currently transitioning careers to manage a showroom in the Flatiron district of Manhattan and is moving homes, all on top of planning her wedding–which is next month! Structure and organization is essential when balancing this many tasks. Keep reading to find out Last Look helped Alexandra plan to tie the knot.

When did you start using Last Look?

Alexandra: I began using Last Look the moment I got engaged. I believe it’s one of the most important times a bride should utilize the app. I had so many ideas I wanted to incorporate into my big day so the app was a great way to keep everything organized. Right now, I have about 12 projects which I have been using the app for over the past year.

Who in your wedding party uses Last Look?

A: Primarily my bridesmaids and I. I have six bridesmaids who live all over–Long Island, Florida, Chicago, they’re everywhere. There are also six groomsmen in our wedding party, but mainly the bridesmaids use the app to coordinate small details and accessories.

How has Last Look made an impact on your wedding planning?

A: The app was the most helpful when picking out bridesmaids dresses. I decided on the Jenny Yoo Soft Tulle Collection, but wasn’t sure of the cut or color I wanted. I was between Lilac and Mayan Blue. I had my bridesmaids try them on and upload photos to see what cut and color worked best. A unique feature of the collection is that it can be styled in several ways because the loose panel design. The panels can be tied in any way imaginable. I wanted each bridesmaid to wear the dress a little differently, so it was great to be able to share feedback in one central place.

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How often do you use Last Look and at what time during the day?

A: I do my wedding planning in bursts. I would hard core plan for two weeks then take a break to balance work and travel. When I’m in the “wedding planning zone”, I use it a lot. Probably daily during those times, either after my 5:00 am work out and while commuting to work or right before bed around 10:00pm.

Do you use Last Look outside of your wedding planning?

A: In the past, I managed social media profiles for various companies. If someone wanted to approve a photo, I would often share the picture through the app. Sharing photos through the app was often more convenient than sending an email or meeting in person. I also used the app from time to time with my fiancé when deciding on home decor. We are in the process of moving, so the app was very useful when envisioning a layout for a particular room.

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What feature of the app do you like the most?

A: I love the check “yes” and x “no” feature. It’s an easy way to give feedback quickly rather than writing out a whole comment. I also like the export to PDF feature because I can save the photos and comments on my computer or easily send to my friends and family.

Have your friends and/or peers involved in your wedding given you further feedback about the app?

A: My bridesmaids like how easy it was to use. Different people in my bridal party like to communicate in different ways–some like to talk on the phone, some like to text, and some like to use the app. Overall, I received great feedback as the app is extremely user friendly. One of my bridesmaids just got engaged last week and after using it for my wedding, I think she will use it for hers too!


Features And Uncategorized

The Importance of Social Media Strategy

14 May 2016 | No Comments | Kara Ladd
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By: Kara Ladd

Over the past ten years the entire digital marketing landscape has transformed. Social media engagement with your consumers through social platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Snapchat has become a vital asset to increase exposure, leads, and sales. Social applications allow users to connect with brands quickly and freely, which also means that brands must curate content at a rapid pace to stay top of mind. However, a company must not diminish quality just because they are creating frequent content. A company must find a healthy balance of quality and quantity. As a result, social media teams must adapt and embrace new digital strategies to help create a seamless flow of brand communication, both B2B and B2C.

New job positions, departments, and technology have also come to fruition and continue to evolve in the ever-changing digital world. Last Look is an app that will stay relevant amidst all of the technological innovation. The app implements a very simple method of valuable image and editorial approvals that can benefit numerous business sectors, especially social media. It is formatted as a constant exchange of marketing collateral and communication, which helps brands stay up to date and on schedule in the fast-paced social media marketing industry. It can be a challenge to delegate and manage social media tasks, but Last Look easily organizes projects and duties generating a steady method from brainstorm and ideation to execution. Last Look was created to support and reinforce the idea that social media is at the heart of digital strategy today.

 


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Features

Legendary Collaboration:
Merce Cunningham & Rei Kawakubo

06 March 2015 | 1 Comment | LASTLOOK Team
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In the contemporary fashion vocabulary, “collaboration” is a term typically used as a marketing catch phrase by retail giants such as Target and H & M. However there are countless other collaborations that are far less commercial, and entail cross-disciplinary projects between designers and artists of other mediums that result in films, art books, objet d’art, and performances. One of the best examples of such a collaboration is an extraordinary project entitled Scenario that renowned choreographer Merce Cunningham created with fashion designer Rei Kawakubo in 1997.

Both Cunningham and Kawakubo created groundbreaking work and were leaders of their respective fields. Kawakubo, founder of Comme des Garcons, began designing in Tokyo in the late 1960s, and was immediately touted as one of the most important members of the sartorial avant-garde. Her perpetually evolving designs were based on pushing boundaries and questioning aesthetic standards. Cunningham was, similarly, at the forefront of his metier, choreographing works for over 50 years that changed the face of contemporary dance and performance.

Fashion was very boring, and I was very angry. I wanted to do something extremely strong. It was a reaction. – Rei Kawakubo

Collaborations were elemental to Cunningham’s practice, and he invited Kawakubo to design the costumes, set and lighting for Scenario. 1997 saw the debut of Comme des Garcons’ notorious spring/summer collection entitled “Body Meets Dress, Dress Meets Body” (later referred to as the “lumps and bumps” show), and it was this body of work that inspired her designs for the collaboration. The now-iconic collection featured bulging, almost grotesque shapes that protruded from the body around the hips, chest, and stomach, made of down padding. Kawakubo has explained that her inspiration for the collection was a reaction to the fashion system: “Fashion was very boring, and I was very angry. I wanted to do something extremely strong. It was a reaction. The feeling was to design the body.”

Comme des Garcons Spring/Summer 1997.

Comme des Garcons Spring/Summer 1997.

Cunningham was known for his chance-driven choreography that focused on the juxtaposition and movement of dancers’ body parts, interacting in a seemingly autonomous way, free of expectations or typical patterns and rules of dance. His aim was to reimagine the shapes a dancer’s body could adopt. As a result, his choreography took on an aesthetic many described as “deformed,” with shapes and movements that twisted the body into unnatural, or at least unprecedented, formations. What better designer to collaborate with, then, than the boundary-pushing fashion maven whose work had drawn very similar interpretations?

The collaboration was especially remarkable because Cunningham and Kawakubo worked independently of one another up until the actual performance, when at last the choreography and designs interacted with each other. The emphasis was, once again, on the idea of leaving things up to chance, and not relying on previously conceived instructions for how things would turn out. The costumes were correspondingly not customized to fit the movements of the dancers, which radically altered their movements by upsetting their sense of proportion and balance. One dancer stated that her costume was like a “hot and bulky parka” and that it interrupted her view of the other dancers, while another noted that she had to adapt her dancing to fit the garment. This was the essence of the collaboration, to create a situation in which the action of the dancers was ultimately left up to chance, depending on how the costumes would effect the dancers ability to carry out the choreography.

Merce Cunningham rehearses with his dance group in 1957.

Merce Cunningham rehearses with his dance group in 1957.

The performance was a stunning mixture of the two iconoclasts’ visions. The performance placed fashion within a context that it normally doesn’t inhabit, and future collaborators would do well to remember the mutually beneficial space offered to fashion by dance. The most effective collaborations are those in which each participant brings their unique approach to the piece, and Scenario fulfilled this better than most.